In 1908, Henry Ford introduced the Model T. Suddenly, affordable, mass-produced, internal combustion engine cars were within the financial reach of Americans.

Another quarter down, another solar record set. According to the latest figures from GTM Research and the Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA), solar had its best second quarter in history. Below, I’ve selected three key stats that I think best help to explain their findings, and the state of solar overall.

Friday morning at 5 a.m. The sky is dark, but the roads are clear and I’m just a few miles away from my AirBnb in Murfreesboro, Tennessee — valuables, pup and nourishment in tow. After 18 hours of driving, I’m exhausted but grateful to be out of harm’s way.

For those of us on the Environment America clean energy team, the solar eclipse is a powerful reminder of the progress solar energy has made, and how much further we need to go. When the last solar eclipse occurred 38 years ago, solar panels were niche products, and electricity generated from the sun made up a negligible piece of our electrical grid.