Report | Environment Ohio

First Energy’s Top Ten Attacks on Clean Energy

For the last several years, Ohio’s largest utility has been the state’s biggest opponent of clean energy. Below are the top ten examples of FirstEnergy’s pattern of bias against Ohio’s clean energy future.

Report | Environment Ohio Research & Policy Center

Building a Solar Cincinnati

Cincinnati can become a solar city. By collaborating with local businesses, anchor institutions and the green community, city leaders can pave the way for a homegrown solar economy. The Cincinnati public is engaged and eager to embrace more solar power. To replace the dirty, dangerous and outdated energy sources of the past and meet public demand, city government alongside civic and corporate partners should adopt a visionary goal of getting at least 10 percent of Cincinnati’s energy from solar power by 2030. By leading-by-example, getting the finances right and building public literacy of solar options, the city of Cincinnati can surmount today’s obstacles and build a green legacy for current and future generations. By targeting key policy areas the city can remove the barriers to “going solar” and with public education and outreach, leading-by-example projects, and securing greater access to financing options, Cincinnati can make this solar vision a reality.

Report | Environment Ohio Research & Policy Center

Wind Power for a Cleaner America

Coal- and natural gas-fired power plants pollute our air, are major contributors to global warming, and consume vast amounts of water—harming our rivers and lakes and leaving less water for other uses. Wind energy has none of these problems. It produces no air pollution, makes no contribution to global warming, and uses no water.

Report | Environment Ohio Research & Policy Center

The Costs of Fracking

Over the past decade, the oil and gas industry has fused two technologies – hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling – to unlock new supplies of fossil fuels in underground rock formations across the United States. “Fracking” has spread rapidly, leaving a trail of contaminated water, polluted air, and marred landscapes in its wake. In fact, a growing body of data indicates that fracking is an environmental and public health disaster in the making.

Report | Environment Ohio Research and Policy Center

When it Rains, it Pours

Global warming is happening now and its effects are being felt in the United States and around the world. Among the expected consequences of global warming is an increase in the heaviest rain and snow storms, fueled by increased evaporation and the ability of a warmer atmosphere to hold more moisture.

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