Updates

Alliance Launched To Save Bees

Sixty-five chefs, restaurant owners and other culinary leaders joined us to launch the Bee Friendly Food Alliance. Through the Alliance, chefs and restaurateurs are calling attention to the importance of bees to our food supply, the dramatic die-off of bee populations, and the need to protect our pollinators. LEARN MORE.

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Second Lake Erie beach has toxic algae

Summer-like weather might be behind us, but toxic, blue-green algae are still sticking around...

Blue-green algae, also called cyanobacteria, are common in most Ohio lakes and streams but grow thick in water polluted with phosphorus from fertilizers, manure and sewage. 

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News Release | Environment Ohio Research & Policy Center

The Cost of Fracking: Environment Ohio Documents the Dollars Drained by Dirty Drilling

Firing a new salvo in the ongoing debate over the gas drilling practice known as fracking, Environment Ohio Research & Policy Center today released a report documenting a wide range of dollars and cents costs imposed by dirty drilling.  As documented in The Cost of Fracking, fracking creates millions of dollars of health costs related to everything from air pollution to ruined roads to contaminated property.

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Report | Environment Ohio Research & Policy Center

The Costs of Fracking

Over the past decade, the oil and gas industry has fused two technologies – hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling – to unlock new supplies of fossil fuels in underground rock formations across the United States. “Fracking” has spread rapidly, leaving a trail of contaminated water, polluted air, and marred landscapes in its wake. In fact, a growing body of data indicates that fracking is an environmental and public health disaster in the making.

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Renew wind tax credit

Wind farms can generate enough electricity to power 250,000 homes. On average, they support more than 1,000 jobs, most of them permanent. Each site adds millions of dollars to the economy.

These figures, which come from the Natural Resources Defense Council, should not become the basis for Ohio's energy decisions. But they strengthen the argument for a four-year extension by Congress of the federal production tax credit for wind power that is set to expire at the end of this year.

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Bad buckeye air

A recent study that ranks Ohio second among the states in the amount of mercury and other airborne toxic substances generated by coal-fired power plants is, sadly, no surprise. But the reality is not something to shrug off either.

If Ohio is to make the transition to a cleaner economy, the private sector will need more incentives. That includes strong enforcement of the state law that requires utilities to embrace more-renewable forms of energy, such as wind and solar power.

It also requires support of a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency rule that aims to curb mercury and other toxic releases. Such initiatives help improve Great Lakes water quality and the region's public health.

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