Updates

First-ever nationwide emissions standards for power plants.
Environment Ohio In Action

In 2011, the Environmental Protection Agency moved ahead with efforts to significantly reduce mercury, soot and smog pollution from power plants. We expect these standards to save up to 46,000 lives nationwide. Together with our national coalition, we helped mobilize more than 800,000 people across the country to contact the EPA in support of safer emissions standards—no other EPA rule has ever received so much support. Environment Ohio Advocate, Julian Boggs, released our "Danger in the Air" report as part of our effort to ensure these rules were adopted.

Blog Post

This isn’t your normal Earth Day. Make it your most impactful. | Ross Sherman

Ideas for action during a challenging time for our environment.

 

 

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Blog Post

Cities can lead the solar energy revolution | Bret Fanshaw

Without federal clean energy leadership, local governments will need to pick up the slack.

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Report | Environment Ohio Research & Policy Center

Our Health at Risk

Despite decades of progress under the Clean Air Act, Americans across the country continue to breathe unhealthy air, leading to increased risk of premature death, asthma attacks and other adverse health impacts.

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Report | Environment Ohio Research and Policy Center

Shining Cities 2017

Solar power grew at a record-breaking pace in 2016. The United States now has 42 gigawatts (GW) of solar photovoltaic (PV) energy capacity, enough to power 8.3 million homes and reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 52.3 million metric tons annually.1 Hundreds of thousands of Americans, especially in our cities, have invested in their own solar panels or solar projects in their communities and millions more are ready to join them.

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News Release | Environment Ohio

"Sheer Reckless Folly"

Today, President Trump signed an executive order rolling back climate progress. The executive order instructs the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to rewrite the Clean Power Plan, the single largest step the U.S. has taken to limit climate change.

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